The Power of Grace – Leslie Jamison – The Atlantic

Sorrow casts its shadow, and joy lives under it, surviving in its shade. This bleed between joy and sorrow doesn’t mean happiness is impossible, or inevitably contaminated; instead it reveals a more capacious vision of happiness than we might have imagined—not grace will never deliver you from this mess, but grace is this mess. Or at least, grace is in the mess with you.

via The Power of Grace – Leslie Jamison – The Atlantic.

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Assuming that the thoughtful student will agree that technique is paramount to the beginner, there is but one more condition to be accepted; the cultivation of a deliberate and tranquil approach toward practice. I cannot overly emphasize that a headlong anxiety to play “pieces” will not be productive; it is harmful from every aspect of good technical development. Only thoughtful, regular, and, yes, joyful daily practice will enable the student to develop mind, muscles, and spirit into a concord of execution and expression.

Aaron Shearer, Classic Guitar Technique, Volume 1

Assuming that the thoughtful student will agree that technique is paramount to the beginner, there is but one more condition to be accepted; the cultivation of a deliberate and tranquil approach toward practice. I cannot overly emphasize that a headlong anxiety to play “pieces” will not be productive; it is harmful from every aspect of good technical development. Only thoughtful, regular, and, yes, joyful daily practice will enable the student to develop mind, muscles, and spirit into a concord of execution and expression.

Aaron Shearer, Classic Guitar Technique, Volume 1

Second, it is better for our own well-being and the well-being of our children if we are cultivating (and modeling) what Buddhists call mudita rather than cultivating and modeling resentment. Meditation teacher Sharon Salzberg describes mudita as “vicarious joy,” or “the pleasure that comes from delighting in other people’s well-being rather than begrudging it.” Experiencing another person’s happiness vicariously really can bring us great happiness; happiness is very contagious. In fact, happiness generally spreads three degrees, affecting not just our friends, but our friend’s friend’s friend’s.

Fathers have more fun « The Berkeley Blog

Second, it is better for our own well-being and the well-being of our children if we are cultivating (and modeling) what Buddhists call mudita rather than cultivating and modeling resentment. Meditation teacher Sharon Salzberg describes mudita as “vicarious joy,” or “the pleasure that comes from delighting in other people’s well-being rather than begrudging it.” Experiencing another person’s happiness vicariously really can bring us great happiness; happiness is very contagious. In fact, happiness generally spreads three degrees, affecting not just our friends, but our friend’s friend’s friend’s.

Fathers have more fun « The Berkeley Blog